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Level 11

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curtail
v. To cut off or cut short.
cycloid
adj. Like a circle.
cygnet
n. A young swan.
darkling
adv. Blindly.
dastard
n. A base coward.
datum
n. A premise, starting-point, or given fact.
dauntless
adj. Fearless.
dearth
n. Scarcity, as of something customary, essential ,or desirable.
debase
v. To lower in character or virtue.
decagon
n. A figure with ten sides and ten angles.
decalogue
n. The ten commandments.
decameter
n. A length of ten meters.
decamp
v. To leave suddenly or unexpectedly.
decapod
adj. Ten-footed or ten-armed.
decasyllable
n. A line of ten syllables.
deciduous
adj. Falling off at maturity as petals after flowering, fruit when ripe, etc.
declamation
n. A speech recited or intended for recitation from memory in public.
declamatory
adj. A full and formal style of utterance.
declarative
adj. Containing a formal, positive, or explicit statement or affirmation.
declension
n. The change of endings in nouns and adj. to express their different relations of gender.
decorous
adj. Suitable for the occasion or circumstances.
deface
v. To mar or disfigure the face or external surface of.
defalcate
v. To cut off or take away, as a part of something.
defame
v. To slander.
defensible
adj. Capable of being maintained or justified.
deforest
v. To clear of forests.
deform
v. To disfigure.
defray
v. To make payment for.
degeneracy
n. A becoming worse.
dehydrate
v. To deprive of water.
deify
v. To regard or worship as a god.
deign
v. To deem worthy of notice or account.
deject
v. To dishearten.
dejection
n. Melancholy.
delectation
n. Delight.
deleterious
adj. Hurtful, morally or physically.
delineate
v. To represent by sketch or diagram.
deliquesce
v. To dissolve gradually and become liquid by absorption of moisture from the air.
demagnetize
v. To deprive (a magnet) of magnetism.
demagogue
n. An unprincipled politician.
demerit
n. A mark for failure or bad conduct.
demobilize
v. To disband, as troops.
demonstrable
adj. Capable of positive proof.
demonstrative
adj. Inclined to strong exhibition or expression of feeling or thoughts.
demonstrator
n. One who proves in a convincing and conclusive manner.
demulcent
n. Any application soothing to an irritable surface
demurrage
n. the detention of a vessel beyond the specified time of sailing.
dendrology
n. The natural history of trees.
denizen
n. Inhabitant.
denominate
v. To give a name or epithet to.
denomination
n. A body of Christians united by a common faith and form of worship and discipline.
denote
v. To designate by word or mark.
denouement
n. That part of a play or story in which the mystery is cleared up.
dentifrice
n. Any preparation used for cleaning the teeth.
denude
v. To strip the covering from.
denunciation
n. The act of declaring an action or person worthy of reprobation or punishment.
deponent
adj. Laying down.
depopulate
v. To remove the inhabitants from.
deportment
n. Demeanor.
depositor
n. One who makes a deposit, or has an amount deposited.
deprave
v. To render bad, especially morally bad.
deprecate
v. To express disapproval or regret for, with hope for the opposite.
depreciate
v. To lessen the worth of.
depreciation
n. A lowering in value or an underrating in worth.
deride
v. To ridicule.
derivation
n. That process by which a word is traced from its original root or primitive form and meaning.
dermatology
n. The branch of medical science which relates to the skin and its diseases.
descry
v. To discern.
desiccant
n. Any remedy which, when applied externally, dries up or absorbs moisture, as that of wounds.
despond
v. To lose spirit, courage, or hope.
despot
n. An absolute and irresponsible monarch.
despotism
n. Any severe and strict rule in which the judgment of the governed has little or no part.
desultory
adj. Not connected with what precedes.
determinate
adj. Definitely limited or fixed.
devilry
n. Malicious mischief.
dexterity
n. Readiness, precision, efficiency, and ease in any physical activity or in any mechanical work.
diabolic
adj. Characteristic of the devil.
diacritical
adj. Marking a difference.
dialectician
n. A logician.
diaphanous
adj. Transparent.
diatomic
adj. Containing only two atoms.
dictum
n. A positive utterance.
didactic
adj. Pertaining to teaching.
differentiate
v. To acquire a distinct and separate character.
diffidence
n. Self-distrust.
diffident
adj. Affected or possessed with self-distrust.
diffusible
adj. Spreading rapidly through the system and acting quickly.
dignitary
n. One who holds high rank.
dilapidated
pa. Fallen into decay or partial ruin.
dilatory
adj. Tending to cause delay.
diminution
n. Reduction.
diphthong
n. The sound produced by combining two vowels in to a single syllable or running together the sounds.
diplomatist
n. One remarkable for tact and shrewd management.
disallow
v. To withhold permission or sanction.
disarrange
v. To throw out of order.
disavow
v. To disclaim responsibility for.
disavowal
n. Denial.
disbeliever
n. One who refuses to believe.
disburden
v. To disencumber.
disburse
v. To pay out or expend, as money from a fund.
Level 12